Synopsis of fossil fungal spores, mycelia and fructifications
Read Online
Share

Synopsis of fossil fungal spores, mycelia and fructifications

  • 890 Want to read
  • ·
  • 84 Currently reading

Published by American Association of Stratigraphic Palynologists Foundation in Dallas, Tex .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Palynology.,
  • Spores (Botany), Fossil.,
  • Fungi, Fossil.,
  • Fungal colonies.,
  • Mycelium.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementby R.M. Kalgutkar and J. Jansonius.
SeriesAASP contributions series -- no. 39., Contributions series -- no. 39.
ContributionsJansonius, J., joint author., American Association of Stratigraphic Palynologists. Foundation., Geological Survey of Canada.
The Physical Object
Pagination429 p. :
Number of Pages429
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL16043977M

Download Synopsis of fossil fungal spores, mycelia and fructifications

PDF EPUB FB2 MOBI RTF

Kalgutkar, R.M.; Jansonius, J. Synopsis of Fossil Fungal Spores, Mycelia and Fructifications. AASP Contributions Series. Kalgutkar RM, Jansonius J () Synopsis of Fossil Fungal Spores, Mycelia and Fructifications. [Contribution Series no. ] Dallas, TX: American Association of . Paragranatisporites Zhong Y. Zhang, Synopsis of Fossil Fungal Spores, Mycelia and Fructifications AASP Contribution Series No. 39 () [MB#]. Synopsis of fossil fungal spores, mycelia and fructifications. American Association of Stratigraphic Palynologists Foundation, Contributions Series Tomescu, A.M.F.

New photographs of 27 species of fossil fungal spores from various publications, and new descriptions of eight of these, are presented in order to substantiate the basis for some nomenclatural changes in the Synopsis of fossil fungal spores, mycelia and fructifications (Kalgutkar and Jansonius, ). Kalgutkar RM, Jansonius J () Synopsis of fossil fungal spores, mycelia, and fructifications. Palynol Soc Contrib Ser – Google Scholar Kar RK, Sharma N, Kar R () Occurrence of fossil fungi in dinosaur dung and its implication on food habit. Fossil fungal remnants are found in the form of spores, mycelia, sporophores, symbiotic associations, and are commonly observed in macerated residues prepared for palynological studies.   Although fungal spores are known throughout geologic time, it is only beginning in the Late Jurassic that they constitute a significant and important fraction of the palynomorphs recovered from most rocks (Elsik, ). Spores of obvious fungal origin, however, are known as early as the Late Silurian. There is an extensive terminology applied to fungal palynomorphs based on living fungi .

  Absence of spores and complete ascocarps of C. neogenicus, however, excludes reliable taxonomical assignment of the discussed fossils both to the extant family Cephalothecaceae and to the other fossil fungi with cephalothecoid fructifications. Fragments of fossil fungal sporocarps described as Adendorfia are similar to walls of peridia with.   They reproduce by means of spores. These spores germinate to produce a mass of interwoven, single-cell wide structures known as hyphae. Hyphae are sometimes also called Shiro. Collectively, masses of hyphae are known as the mycelium. Fungus absorbs nutrients from its environment (substrate, log, etc) through its mycelium in a two-stage process. (pollen grains and spores). The results of palynological studies were described in detail (Worobiec & Worobiec ). During the current investigation, all these slides were re-examined for the presence of remains of epiphyllous fungi. Terminology for the morphology of fungal fructifications follows Korf () and Wu et al. ().   Like modern fungi, fungi from previous ages likely produced abundant filamentous hyphae or rhizoids for somatic growth and copious spores for sexual and asexual propagation. The ‘Synopsis of fossil fungal spores, mycelia and fructifications’ by Kalgutkar & Jansonius helps document this diversity. The online version, the Kalgutkar and.